Tony Garnett portrait

Tony Garnett

The Day the Music Died – A Life Lived Behind the Lens

Festival of Ideas/
Sun 30 October 2016

Tony Garnett

The Day the Music Died – A Life Lived Behind the Lens

Tony Garnett portrait
Sun 30 October 2016,

Tony Garnett is responsible for some of the most memorable television to appear on our screens. Up the Junction, Cathy Come Home (screening Sun 30 Oct at 15:30) and This Life, amongst many others, were landmark dramas which changed the way television was made and, in some cases, changed society. Garnett, now 80, tells for the first time how he became one of the most influential figures in television, and reveals the family tragedies that shaped his remarkable body of work. He presents an evocative portrait of working class life in Birmingham in the forties and fifties and of Leftist London in the swinging sixties and seventies, and a wry look at the harsh realities of working in British television and in Hollywood. There’s much to discuss too about families and communities, social mobility and the contemporary state of TV.

Part of Watershed’s Cinema of Dissent season which is inspired by Ken Loach’s impassioned acceptance speech at Cannes. A weekend of films and talks exploring artistic dissent around the world and celebrating the filmmakers who, despite restrictions, demonstrate a desire to keep this important cinematic tradition alive.

Image credit: Helen Warner

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