Final-Frankenstein-image-copyright-Alys-Jones

Animating the Inanimate

Automation and Frankenstein

Bristol800/
Fri 22 April 2016

Animating the Inanimate

Automation and Frankenstein

Final-Frankenstein-image-copyright-Alys-Jones
Fri 22 April 2016,

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818) was published during a time of significant technological possibility. Objects and strange new organisms alike seemed to spring to life with the twist of an inventor’s wrench or the poke of a doctor’s scalpel. With such advancements came cultural upheaval and concern. The very essence of life was called into question. Panellists Marie Mulvey-Roberts, Emily Blewitt and Teresa Heffernan investigate the cultural implications of Frankenstein at this historical moment, and explore the novel’s ongoing relevance to contemporary concerns around technology and the embodied self. Chaired by Jennifer Whitney of the Digital Cultures Research Centre, University of the West of England.

This is one of the events in a special weekend of activity looking at Frankenstein, culture and science. It is part of Bristol800: a programme throughout 2016 marking significant anniversaries in the city and what they mean for Bristol now and into the future. Mary Shelley lived in Bristol in 1815. Bristol800 is an initiative of Bristol Cultural Development Partnership (Arts Council England, Bristol City Council and Business West). Illustration by Alys Jones, specially commissioned for Frankenstein, culture and science.

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